HIV epidemic and cascade of care in 12 east African rural fishing communities: results from a population-based survey in Uganda.

Authors: Burgos-Soto J Ben Farhat J Alley I Ojuka P Mulogo E Kise-Sete T Bouhenia M Salumu L Mathela R Langendorf C Cohuet S Huerga H
Journal Reference: BMC public health 2020 Jun 19; 20(1); 970. doi: 10.1186/s12889-020-09121-6. Epub 2020 06 19
Africa Antiretroviral therapy Cascade of care Communities Diagnosis Epidemic Fishing HIV Viral suppression
eng

Abstract

BACKGROUND: In East Africa, fishing communities are considered most-at-risk populations for the acquisition of HIV. We estimated HIV prevalence and assessed progress towards the UNAIDS 90-90-90 targets along the HIV treatment cascade in 12 fishing communities surrounding Lakes Edward and George, Uganda.

METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional household-based survey between September and November 2016. All adults between 15 and 69 years old were eligible to participate. Children below 15 years old were eligible for HIV testing if either parent was HIV-positive. Viral load testing was done for all HIV-infected individuals. Logistic regression models adjusted for sociodemographic-behavioral variables were used to assess the association between occupation and HIV positivity.

RESULTS: Overall, 1738 adults (959 women, 779 men) and 148 children were included. Adult inclusion rate was 96.0%. Of the men, 58% reported to be fishermen. The HIV-prevalence among adults was 17.5% (95%CI: 15.8-19.4) and 6.1% (95%CI: 3.1-11.4) among HIV-exposed children. HIV prevalence was higher among women than among men (20.9% vs. 13.5%, p 

CONCLUSIONS: HIV prevalence was high in these fishing communities, particularly among women and fishermen. Important progress has been made along the HIV treatment cascade, and the UNAIDS goal for viral suppression in population was achieved. However, gaps remain and HIV care strategies focusing on young people are urgently needed. HIV preventive interventions should target particularly women, young people and fishermen though HIV preventive and care services should remain available to the whole fishing communities.